Recurring Server-Side Traces

Kevin Hill shows how to set up a server-side trace which runs periodically:

How to set up a recurring Server-side SQL trace that runs every hour for 10 minutes.

Issues:

  • 6 people in the room are staring at me waiting for the last second request to be done at the end of an 11 hour day (3 of them from the VBV – Very Big Vendor)

  • Trace file names must be different, or you get errors

  • Trace files cannot end with a number

  • I can’t tell time when I am hungry and tired

Extended Events are still the preferred method over server-side traces for getting information, but when a vendor demands traces, the scope for saying “There’s a better way” diminishes quickly, and it’s good to know how to create a server-side trace so you aren’t opening Profiler regularly.

How Do You Trace?

Erin Stellato wants to know how you use Profiler and server-side traces:

Back in April I wrote a post asking why people tend to avoid Extended Events.  Many of you provided feedback, which I greatly appreciated.  A common theme in the responses was time.  Many people found that creating an event session in Extended Events that was comparable to one they would create in Trace took longer.  Ok, I get that…so as a follow up I am interested in knowing how you typically use Profiler and Trace.  If you would be willing to share that information, I would be extremely grateful.

Head over there and let her know.  For science!

Monitoring SSAS Using Profiler

Chris Webb has part 2 of his SSAS multi-dimensional monitoring series:

What’s clear from these examples is that trying to relate what’s going on in the query to what you see in Profiler is quite tricky even for seemingly simple queries; for most real-world queries it would be almost impossible to do so with total confidence. That said, when I’m tuning queries I usually comment out large parts of the code to try to isolate problems, thus creating much simpler queries, and I hope the value of this post will lie in you being able to spot similar patterns in Profiler to the ones I show here when you do the same thing. In part 3 of this series I’ll show you some practical examples of how all this information can help you tune your own queries.

Whenever I read Profiler, my next question is “Is there an extended event which covers this?”

Watch TMP Space

Erin Stellato shows us that Extended Events and Profiler both use local temp storage:

Depending on what events you have configured for Profiler, your filter(s), the workload, and how long you run Profiler, you could generate more events than the UI can handle. Therefore, they’ll start buffering to the User TMP location. If you’re not paying attention, you can fill up the C: drive. This can cause applications (including SQL Server) to generate errors or stop working entirely. Not good.

Reference: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174203.aspx

Now, back to the original question. Does the same problem exist for Extended Events? Only if you’re using the Live Data Viewer.  After you have an event session created (you can just use system_health for this example), within Management Studio, go to Management | Extended Events | Sessions, select the session and right-click and select Watch Live Data

This is one of those things you hardly think about, but it makes sense:  that data’s got to be stored somewhere if things are moving too fast for the app.

Categories

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