Cross-Platform Database Restoration

Max Trinidad walks through restoring a SQL Server database to a new Linux instance:

So, before you start working or trying to restore your Windows SQL Databases to SQL Server on Linux, there are a few things you may need to do. This will involved installing components which are not installed by default when first build your Linux System.

One thing I had to say with confidence! You WILL find all your answer on the internet. Any of the Linux Distro forum have your resolution to any of the issue you may encountered. Also, most of the time you Linux system will tell you (or gives a tip) what do with missing dependencies.

Other than that, there are Linux Application Updater solution to help keep your system up-to-date.

This is an amazing time to be in the SQL Server space.

Ola’s Jobs On Linux

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

Linux

Joey D’Antoni gives a few pointers around SQL Server on Linux, including running Ola Hallengren’s scripts on a system without a SQL Server Agent:

Aside from a couple of DMVs that show you Linux specific performance information, everything in SQL Server on Linux is the same. Some of the HA and DR functionality is not complete, and the SQL Agent is not done, however you can use cron (and if you’re familiar with Linux, you should learn about cron—I’ll have another post on that next week).

These are some good notes, so check it out.

Installing SQL Server On Ubuntu

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-17

Linux

James Anderson installs SQL Server on Ubuntu:

’m installing Ubuntu 16 on a Hyper-V VM. I’ll be using a generation 1 Hyper-V VM as I’ve had much better luck installing Linux VMs on these. I’ve had boot and performance issues with Linux on Generation 2 VMs.

After installing Ubuntu I followed the instructions in the SQL Server Linux documentation and recorded my progress below.

For Ubuntu we need to register the SQL Server repository before we can use the apt-get package manager to download and install SQL Server.

This step-by-step walkthrough shows that installing SQL Server on Linux is pretty easy:  it’s just a single package (RPM or DEB depending upon your flavor of Linux).

SQL Server ODBC For Linux 13.0

Kevin Feasel

2016-10-26

Linux

Meet Bhagdev reports that a new version of the SQL Server ODBC driver for Linux is available:

What’s new

  • Native Linux Install Experience: The driver can now be installed with apt-get (Ubuntu), yum (RedHat/CentOS) and Zypper (SUSE). Instructions on how to do this is below.

  • AlwaysOn Availability Groups (AG): The driver now supports transparent connections to AlwaysOn Availability Groups. The driver quickly discovers the current AlwaysOn topology of your server infrastructure and connects to the current active server transparently.

  • TLS 1.2 support: The driver now supports TLS 1.2 connections to SQL Server.

These are some nice additions.  None of them are groundbreaking, but they add up to a nice release.  Click through for instructions on how to install the driver; it got a lot easier for supported platforms.

VS Code And Powershell

Max Trinidad explains how to get Powershell running with Visual Studio Code on Ubuntu:

Using VS Code Debug

First, we are going to use VS Code debug option to run PowerShell Out-Of-The-Box. This way we can be use debug to execute and step thru the PowerShell script code.

Open the folder were the scripts are going to be stored. The first time using the Debug it will ask to create the “launch.json” which is needed in order to execute and debug the script.  Accept the default values as you can change them later if needed.

Read on; it’s a whole new world…

Service Fabric On Linux

Mark Russinovich announces that Azure Service Fabric will be available on Linux:

Given its beginnings, Service Fabric supports Windows servers and .NET applications, but many enterprises today run heterogeneous workloads, including Windows and Linux servers, .Net and Java applications, and SQL and NoSQL databases. That’s why I am excited to announce today that the preview of Service Fabric for Linux will be publicly available at our Ignite conference on September 26.  With today’s announcement customers can now provision Service Fabric clusters in Azure using Linux as the host operating system and deploy Java applications to Service Fabric clusters. Service Fabric on Linux will initially be available for Ubuntu, with support for RHEL coming soon.

This isn’t a huge announcement for many people, but it’s a positive sign.

Powershell All The Things

Max Trinidad reports that Microsoft is making Powershell a cross-platform language:

This is PowerShell Core only, Alpha Version 6.0.0.9 and there’s a lot of work to do. Bugs and feedback are been submitted as the community are contributing for it success.

This version is also available for Windows 10 / Server 2016 and Windows 8.1 / Server 2012 R2. You can have it side-by-side with the current version of PowerShell.

Max has notes on how to install it on Ubuntu.  Given that Microsoft is bringing Bash to Windows and Powershell to Linux, these are interesting times.

Powershell + Bash

Max Trinidad shows how to integrate Powershell with Bash in Windows 10:

If it worth knowing that in order to get Bash, it’s a feature you need to installed it first. The following is the series of steps I use to enabled and install Bash on my desktop. And, after enabling Bash, I started using it under the PowerShell Console.

Apropos of this, I read a very interesting article by Alex Clemmer yesterday on how terrible the Windows command line is.  Powershell and Bash are way, way better for pretty much any purpose, other than perhaps experiencing masochism.

Installing ODBC Drivers

Kevin Feasel

2016-04-21

Linux

Steph Locke shows how to install the SQL Server ODBC drivers in Ubuntu:

Did you know you can now get SQL Server ODBC drivers for Ubuntu? Yes, no, maybe? It’s ok even if you haven’t since it’s pretty new! Anyway, this presents me with an ideal opportunity to standardise my SQL Server ODBC connections across the operating systems I use R on i.e. Windows and Ubuntu. My first trial was to get it working on Travis-CI since that’s where all my training magic happens and if it can’t work on a clean build like Travis, then where can it work?

Now I can create R functionality that can reliably depend on SQL Server without having to fallback to JDBC. A definite woohoo moment!

Thanks to Steph for putting together this script.

Joining Ubuntu To AD

Chrissy LeMaire shows us how to connect to AD from Ubuntu:

Since 2009, it seems that a couple things have changed in the client realm. In particular, winbindfell out of favor to Likewise Open (which I used to <3) which was bought by BeyondTrust and turned into PowerBroker Open. But that’s since fallen out of favor to the SSSD or “System Security Services Daemon“. SSSD seems pretty cool but everyone hates its name and assume that its name is keeping it from greater adoption.

Sometimes when researching SSSD, you’ll come across a few mentions of FreeIPA which is similar to Active Directory, OpenLDAP, and ApacheDS. Oh, and I recently found out thatSamba4 allows Linux servers to join Active Directory as Domain Controllers (!!) but I can’t tell if it can be a forest of its own (reddit review here).

There are other players I’m leaving out but after a bit of casual research, no others seem to stand out. Ultimately, while there are a number of ways to setup AD/Linux authentication with Ubuntu, it appears that SSSD is the current way to go. Let’s go ahead and set that up.

Cf Ryan Adams and LeMaire’s separate posts back in March on the topic.  As Microsoft gets serious about Linux integration, I would love to see them simplify this process significantly, either by updating an existing open-source project (my preference) or creating their own open-source project.

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