Finding Last DBCC Command Runs

Andrew Kelly has a script to find the last time somebody ran a DBCC command like DBCC FREEPROCCACHE:

Let me explain a few things about the script. I am getting the path of the current trace file and placing it into a variable. The current file name will almost certainly have a suffix of _nn just before the .trc extension.  If I were to run the script as is I would only be reading the current log file and not the other 4 that preceded it. If all you care about is the current log file then fine but most will want to search all the existing log files. One way to do this is to simply replace the current file name with just log.trc and use default as the 2nd parameter as I did above in the fn_trace_gettable function. The default parameter value tells the function to read all files from that one onward. even though log.trc doesn’t actually exist it knows how to handle it and reads all of the existing trace files in order.

So if the string that we search on (here we use ‘dbcc free%’) is in any of the files it will return the matching rows. You may have to adjust the wildcards and such but I think you get the idea. Again remember that the data is transient so always look at the StartTime column in the logs to ensure you know which Date and Time range you are looking at. You can do something like this but I will leave that up to you.

SELECT MIN(StartTime) AS [Begin], MAX(StartTime) AS [End]  FROM ::fn_trace_gettable(@Path,default)

A word of caution in that I never bothered to see just how resource intensive this function is. while I don’t expect any issues with normal use it is not something you want to be searching on every second. Be sensible and you should have no problems.

Click through for more details, including the script Andy uses to do this search.

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