Extensions Are Important

Kenneth Fisher on database file extensions:

So what does this mean? Should we start naming our database files whatever we want? No, absolutely not! It means that you need to be extra careful when specifying the name of the files. You really don’t want to use non-standard file names. The confusion! The misunderstandings! Do you really want the operating system to think your database file is a really big picture? Or even worse (and while I realize this sounds like a stretch I’ve had it happen) you accidentally give your file a .bak extension. Then one day your automated process that deletes old bak files runs as the same time your instance is down. Bye bye database file.

You can use whatever extension you want, but be smart about it.  Also check out Sean McCown’s dirty fun trick.

Azure Storage Options

James Serra walks us through the list of storage options available on Azure:

Microsoft Azure is a cloud computing platform and infrastructure, created by Microsoft, for building, deploying and managing applications and services through a global network of Microsoft-managed and Microsoft partner-hosted datacenters.  Included in this platform are multiple ways of storing data.  Below I will give a brief overview of each so you can get a feel for the best use case for each, with links provided that go into more detail:

There are several options available, running the gamut from unstructured data (blob storage, file & disk storage), semi-structured data (data lake store), to structured data (Azure SQL Database) and a few points in between.

SQL Server Startup Parameters

Shawn Melton shows us how to modify SQL Server startup parameters using Powershell:

Low and behold the StartupParameters property is one that can be read and set. So how do you set it? Well the one thing to remember is you DO NOT need to remove what is already in that property because IT WILL BREAK YOUR SERVER!

Let me be clear, setting the property means you need to append to what is already there, so don’t just go setting it equal to something like “-T1118”. Doing this will remove the required parameters to start SQL Server itself, and no it will never warn you of this…so proceed at your own risk.

Read the instructions; otherwise, you can mess up your installation, and that’d be a bad thing.

Powershell Service Management

Mike Fal gives us a pattern for managing SQL Server services with Powershell, WMI, and SMO:

I have built a function around using the second method that makes handling this process a little easier. Also, because I’m not a fan of passing passwords in plain text, I built the function to take a PSCredential object to keep my account information secure. In order to spare you the wall of text, you can view the full function on my GitHub repository.

The function can be loaded through a variety of methods, but once it is loaded calling it is simply a matter of creating the credential for the service account and calling the function

Good stuff.

SQL Server 2016 CTP 3.1

Manoj Pandey tells us that SQL Server 2016 CTP 3.1 is now available:

–> Following are enhancements in some areas:

1. New In-Memory OLTP improvements, including Unique indexes, LOB data types, and Indexes with NULLable key columns.

2. The COMPRESS and DECOMPRESS functions convert values into and out of the GZIP algorithm.

The list goes on, but item #1 is intriguing.

SSIS Variables

Mark Broadbent has a few nuggets of information regarding using variables in SSIS script components:

Notice that in the example above the assumption is that the SSIS variable datatype is compatible with the script variable type.

Once you have finished writing your code block you may save your code and close the Script Editor. All that is left is to click the OK button to close the Script Task Editor and run your package!

Getting variables to work in script components isn’t terribly difficult, but Mark shows that there are quite a few steps to the process.

Multi-Script Using Object Explorer Details

Andrea Allred shows a nice trick using the Object Explorer Details window in SSMS:

One of the tips that I was super surprised that many people didn’t know is the Object Explorer Details. It allows you to delete multiple objects at once, script out multiple objects at once and just do some really cool stuff. How do I access this magic you are asking? When in management studio, click on View>>Object Explorer Details.

For those one-off jobs where you need to script out a dozen objects, this is very helpful.

 

Trigger Blue Screens

David Klee uses the registry to generate blue screens:

Voila! Use the USB keyboard registry key. Set it and reboot the machine. To trigger it, hold right-control and hit scroll lock twice.

BOOM! Immediate manually-initiated BSOD. Neat, huh?

Me, I just need to update my video card drivers; that gives me all the blue screens I want…

Find Duplicate Indexes In SSDT

Ed Elliott has another nice tool in his SSDT Dev Pack:

This new tool for the SSDT Dev Pack adds a menu item (Tools–>SSDT Dev Pack –> Find Duplicate Indexes) what it does is scan all the projects in the solution (it doesn’t follow “this database” references to examine them, maybe a future version) and then print to the output window a list of all the duplicate indexes based on the table, the columns and included columns – I don’t check anything else so you might actually want a duplicate in some circumstances but these should be very few and far between.

If you double click on the index it will take you to the location in the code where it actually is so you can delete it 🙂

A very useful tool gets even more useful.

SSPI Context

Sean McCown goes into fixing one example of the “Cannot Generate SSPI Context” error:

Now, this was just a quick tutorial on how to manage SPNs.  This hole can go pretty deep.  Here’s a decent link on MSDN for troubleshooting SPNs.  I don’t think I like their troubleshooting because they don’t really do a good job of showing you the commands, but it’s a good explanation of the problem, what an SPN is, etc.  If I remember correctly it’ll also help you choose the right SPN.

This is a classic example of a bad Microsoft error.  In this case, it’s bad because there are multiple root causes for the same error and because the message itself is unhelpful.

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