Overriding Spark Dependencies

Landon Robinson shows how to override a Spark dependency located on the classpath:

This doesn’t draw the line exactly where the method changed from private to public, but generally speaking:
– gson-2.2.4.jar: the method is private, and therefore too old for use here
– gson-2.6.1: the method is public, and works fine.
Somewhere between the two, the method’s status changed.

So, because I had some functionality that required the method be public and accessible, it was important I specify the right version in my dependency manager (SBT). “That’s easy,” I thought. “No problem.”

Spoilers: there was a problem.

ACID Transactions on Spark

Achilleus explains one of the big announcements at Spark+AI Summit 2019:

Delta Lake is basically a compute layer that would sit on top of your existing On Prem HDFS cluster, your favourite Cloud storage or even run it locally on your laptop(Best part)! Data is stored on the above-mentioned storage as versioned Parquet files. Any data that is read using Spark can be used to read and write with Delta Lake. Delta lakes provides an unified platform to support both Batch Processing and Stream processing workloads on a single platform.

Read on to understand just how useful this is.

Spark+AI Summit 2019 Announcements

Victoria Holt creates a roundup of Spark+AI Summit 2019 announcements:

Rohan Kumar  of Microsoft announced .NET for Apache Spark, making Apache Spark accessible to .NET developers – Git Hub

I’m very happy that the Spark for .NET team added F# support. Spark is so much nicer when using functional programming.

Spark UDFs in Scala

Achilleus shows us how to create a user-defined function for Spark in Scala, as well as the performance drawbacks:

It is pretty straight forward and easy to create it in spark. Let’s say we have this customer data from Central Perk. If you look at the country data, it has a lot of discrepancies but we kinda know its the right country, it’s just that the way it is entered is not typical. Let’s say we need to normalize it to the USA that is similar with the help of a known dictionary.

The performance hit is often too much for me to accept, though that could just be that I write bad functions.

ETL with Spark and Hive

Emrah Mete gives us an example of using Apache Spark for ETL into Apache Hive:

Now let’s go to the construction of the sample application. In the example, we will first send the data from our Linux file system to the data storage unit of the Hadoop ecosystem (HDFS) (for example, Extraction). Then we will read the data we have written here with Spark and then we will apply a simple Transformation and write to Hive (Load). Hive is a substructure that allows us to query the data in the hadoop ecosystem, which is stored in this environment. With this infrastructure, we can easily query the data in our big data environment using SQL language.

Most of the things relational database professionals do are pretty much the same things that you do with Spark and Hive. There are differences in implementation and level of programming familiarity, but they’re pretty similar.

Processing Fixed-Width Files with Spark

Subhasish Guha shows how you can read a fixed-with file with Apache Spark:

A fixed width file is a very common flat file format when working with SAP, Mainframe, and Web Logs. Converting the data into a dataframe using metadata is always a challenge for Spark Developers. This particular article talks about all kinds of typical scenarios that a developer might face while working with a fixed witdth file. This solution is generic to any fixed width file and very easy to implement. This also takes care of the Tail Safe Stack as the RDD gets into the foldLeft operator.

It’s a little more complicated than with R, where stringr can handle fixed-width formats. But it’s not bad.

Sentiment Analysis with Spark on Qubole

Jonathan Day, et al, have a tutorial on using Qubole to build a sentiment analysis model:

This post covers the use of Qubole, Zeppelin, PySpark, and H2O PySparkling to develop a sentiment analysis model capable of providing real-time alerts on customer product reviews. In particular, this model allows users to monitor any natural language text (such as social media posts or Amazon reviews) and receive alerts when customers post extremely nice (high sentiment) or extremely negative (low sentiment) comments about their products.

In addition to introducing the frameworks used, we will also discuss the concepts of embedding spaces, sentiment analysis, deep neural networks, grid search, stop words, data visualization, and data preparation.

Click through for the demo.

Pivoting Spark DataFrames

Unmesha Sreeveni shows how we can pivot a DataFrame in Apache Spark using one line of code:

A pivot can be thought of as translating rows into columns while applying one or more aggregations.

Lets see how we can achieve the same using the above dataframe.

We will pivot the data based on “Item” column.

Click through for the code. This is an area where dropping back into Scala or Python is a lot more lines-of-code efficient than sticking to SQL.

Troubleshooting Spark Performance

Bikas Saha and Mridul Murlidharan explain some of the basics of performance tuning with Apache Spark:

Our objective was to build a system that would provide an intuitive insight into Spark jobs that not just provides visibility but also codifies the best practices and deep experience we have gained after years of debugging and optimizing Spark jobs. The main design objectives were to be
– Intuitive and easy – Big data practitioners should be able to navigate and ramp quickly
– Concise and focused – Hide the complexity and scale but present all necessary information in a way that does not overwhelm the end user
– Batteries included – Provide actionable recommendations for a self service experience, especially for users who are less familiar with Spark
– Extensible – To enable additions of deep dives for the most common and difficult scenarios as we come across them

The tool looks pretty interesting and I’m hoping it will be part of the open source suite at Cloudera.

Spark Memory Management on EMR

Karunanithi Shanmugam gives us some tips on memory management for Spark in Amazon’s ElasticMapReduce:

Amazon EMR provides high-level information on how it sets the default values for Spark parameters in the release guide. These values are automatically set in the spark-defaults settings based on the core and task instance types in the cluster.

To use all the resources available in a cluster, set the maximizeResourceAllocation parameter to true. This EMR-specific option calculates the maximum compute and memory resources available for an executor on an instance in the core instance group. It then sets these parameters in the spark-defaults settings. Even with this setting, generally the default numbers are low and the application doesn’t use the full strength of the cluster. For example, the default for spark.default.parallelism is only 2 x the number of virtual cores available, though parallelism can be higher for a large cluster.

Spark on YARN can dynamically scale the number of executors used for a Spark application based on the workloads. Using Amazon EMR release version 4.4.0 and later, dynamic allocation is enabled by default (as described in the Spark documentation).

There’s a lot in here, much of which applies to Spark in general and not just EMR.

Categories

July 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jun  
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031