Handling Runbook Alerts

Grant Fritchey shows how to set up alerting when an Azure automation job fails:

Believe it or not, there’s not an immediately obvious “Oh, you had an error in your Automation script, here’s how you alert someone” setting in the Azure portal. Now, you could simply put error handling in your PowerShell script. In fact, it’s probably not at all a bad idea to do that as well. However, what you would not get setting things up that way is a mechanism for managing the alerts, history, additional possible responses (like firing off another Runbook, although there is way to do that from the PowerShell too). Instead, what I want is way to manage alerts through the Azure fabric.

If you do a search, there is an Azure Alert service. However, it didn’t seem to be really what I was looking for. Further, I found it extremely difficult (OK, I couldn’t make it work) to connect the alerts directly to the Jobs related to my Runbooks. Instead, after quite a bit of research, what I found is a combination of Azure Log Analytics with the Operations Management Suite (OMS) will do exactly what I’m looking for.

Click through to read how to set this up.

Troubleshooting Cluster Creation Errors

Mark Broadbent diagnoses an error which seems misleading at first:

One such problem is when you use the New-Cluster command to add all your nodes in one go.

New-Cluster -Name magrathea -node server5,server6,server7
-staticaddress 192.168.1.70

Simple right? Well no. In this instance I ran into the following error:

New-Cluster : There was an error adding node 'server7' to the cluster
the node cannot be contacted. Ensure that the node is powered on and is connected to the network.

Read on for an example of piecemeal debugging.  Mark’s advice is to keep things simple, as in this case at least, you can’t count on the error messages coming back to be completely accurate.

Operating System Error 3

Stacy Brown provides common reasons for why you might get Operating System Error 3:

Sometimes the users of SQL Backup Master may face the following error while executing the database backup job:

Msg 3201, Level 16, State 1, Line 1
Job Execution Error: Cannot open backup device ‘’ Operating System error 3 (The system cannot find the path specified.)

Now, there can be the various possible reasons behind the occurrence of this error. Therefore, in the following sections, all possible reason with their respective solutions are discussed. A user can refer them to solve this SQL Server operating system error 3(the system cannot find the path specified.)

Click through for solutions to several potential causes of this error.

Steps Recorder

Monica Rathbun shows how to use the Steps Recorder in Windows:

Windows PSR “Problem Steps Recorder”.  It’s a nifty tool that helps you trouble shoot a computer problem by recording step by step what the user is doing.

How to:

  • Go to Start

  • Windows Accessories

  • Steps Recorder or Problem Steps Recorder depending on Windows version

  • Select Start Record (App will popup)

That’s a new one on me; click through to check it out.

Compressed Backup Errors

Kenneth Fisher explains why you might get “out of space” errors when taking compressed backups:

Compressing your backups has very few downsides. It’s usually faster (the additional time for compression is less than the time saved by reduced IO) and of course, the backups are smaller. I have run into a few issues, however.

On one occasion there was 75gb free on a drive, the last full backup was only 50gb and the database had not grown significantly in size. Interestingly there was an error when we tried to run a backup. Not enough disk space.

Read on for the explanation as well as the solution.

Error Log Column Size

Cody Konior tests how long messages in the error log can be:

Stupid question… what’s the schema of a table with sys.sp_readerrorlog output? Well you might be surprised if you’re used to using nvarchar(max) or nvarchar(2048).

There’s a datetime (modern datetime2(3)) obviously. ProcessInfo is either “Server” or “spidxxxy” where xxx is an int (max of 11 characters including minus) and y is an optional single character suffix. But as for the text…

Let’s try to max it out!

Moral of the story:  keep those error messages as short as possible while still being meaningful.

Powershell Errors

Shane O’Neill explains what the $error variable does:

Now ignoring the fact that you already know what is wrong, this tells me that there is either something wrong with the $Database variable, the $sql variable or the syntax statement. Maybe even something else though!
This is not helpful and I’m going to have a bad time.

I encountered this lately and thanks to Chrissy LeMaire ( b | t ), I was introduced to the $error variable.

Shane also has an interesting side note around error colors.

SQL Server Error Handling Scenarios

Dan Guzman goes into some detail about error handling in SQL Server:

T-SQL and ADO.NET data access code must work in concert with one another to ensure SQL errors are detected in application code. The T-SQL constructs used in multi-statement batches can affect if and how when errors are reported by ADO.NET during batch execution. I’ll start by citing core T-SQL error handling objectives, which can be summarized as:

1) Ensure a multi-statement T-SQL batch doesn’t continue after an error occurs.
2) Rollback transaction after errors.
3) Raise error so that the client application is aware a problem occurred.

Read the whole thing.

Cannot Generate SSPI Context

Dave Mason troubleshoots an annoying connectivity error message:

Ah! An “SSPI” error. I was certain I knew what the problem was. It had to be a failure to properly register the SPN. I was prepared to run a few SetSPN.exe commands to fix the problem and be on my way. To my surprise, the SPN *was* registered correctly, as I discovered in the Log File Viewer:

Click through for the solution.

Troubleshooting SSRS 4xx Errors

Jeff Pries explains how to troubleshoot various Reporting Services configuration errors:

After installing SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS), are you receiving an Error 404, Error 400, “Invalid Request” error, or “Bad Connection” error on first visiting the SSRS web portal (the error message seems to vary based on version, browser, and whether accessing via http/https or /reports vs /reportserver) ?

I’ve run into this a few times so I’m listing the steps I’ve used to fix it.  For me, the root cause of this error has been the SSRS Configuration Wizard automatically configuring SSRS to use HTTPS, but assigning an invalid machine SSL Certificate.  The fix is to self-generate a new and valid SSL certificate for the SSRS website to use.

Jeff then provides step-by-step instructions.

Categories

August 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jul  
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031