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Category: Business Intelligence

Interchangability between ADF and Synapse Integration Pipelines

Paul Andrew makes a discovery:

Inspired by an earlier blog where we looked at ‘How Interchangeable Delta Tables Are Between Databricks and Synapse‘ I decided to do a similar exercise, but this time with the integration pipeline components taking centre stage.

As I said in my previous blog post, the question in the heading of this blog should be incredibly pertinent to all solution/technical leads delivering an Azure based data platform solution so to answer it directly:

Read on to learn the answer.

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Diving into Data Mesh

Ust Oldfield has a series on data mesh. First up is a primer on the topic:

What is a Data Mesh? Data Mesh is new and was introduced in a few articles by Zhamak Dehghani, starting in May 2019. The first article, How To Move Beyond a Monolithic Data Lake to a Distributed and Data Mesh, and the second article, Data Mesh Principles and Logical Architecture, form the foundational thought pieces on data meshes. Very simply, and crudely, a Data Mesh aims to overcome the deficiencies of previous generations of analytical architectures by decentralising the ownership and production of analytical data to the teams who own the data domain. It is a convergence of Distributed Domain Driven Architecture, Self-serve Platform Design, and Product Thinking with Data.

Essentially applying the learnings from operational systems, of applying domain driven design, so that ownership of data is domain oriented. For example, a CRM team will own the Customer domain and all the data within it. Instead of data from all domains flowing into a central data repository, the individual domains curate and serve their datasets in an easily consumable way. A much closer alignment between operational and analytical data.

Then Ust has a deep dive:

A foundational principle of data mesh is the decentralisation of ownership of data to those closest to it. Those closest to it are those in the business, often using the operational systems and also using analytical data. Responsibility and ownership of the data is devolved from a central function to business units and domains. Therefore any change to how a business domain organises itself is limited to the domain itself rather than impacting the entire organisation. This is referred to as the bounded domain context.

Teams responsible for the business operation, e.g. CRM team responsible for Customers, are also responsible for the ownership and serving of the analytical data relating to their domain.

I probably need to spend more time thinking about it, but this feels like a rickety ladder of incentive compatibility problems. I agree with Ust’s characterization of warehouses as staid and that relatively little has happened since the Kimball model came to prominence, but this sounds like taking the problems of the Kimball model (slow to change, an iceberg of code & ETL, etc.) and effectively saying “Hey, here are slightly different views of the source systems, have fun” instead. That way, everybody gets to experience the joy of non-conforming dimensions, disagreeing facts, working with data in different grains, and seven terms for the same thing.

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Fun with Excel Cube Functions

Chris Webb has a new series on Excel cube functions combined with Lambda helper functions. First up, Chris collects items from a set:

This example shows the fundamental problem that has always existed with CubeRankedMember though: in order to show all the items in a set you need to know how many items there are in advance, and populate as many cells with CubeRankedMember formulas as there are items. In this case see how the range B4:B6 contains the numbers 1, 2 and 3; these numbers are used in the formulas in the range C4:C6 to get the first, second and third items in the set.

If a fourth product was added to the table, however, it would not appear automatically – you would have to add another cell with another CubeRankedMember formula in it manually. I’ve seen some workarounds but they’re a bit hacky and require you to know what the maximum possible number of items in a set could ever be. Indeed that’s always been one of the key differences between cube functions and PivotTables: cube functions are static whereas PivotTables can grow and shrink dynamically when the data changes.

Read on for a better answer. Then, check out part 2, which covers generating a dynamic table using Excel cube functions and Lambda helpers:

In the first post in this series I showed how to use the new Excel Lambda helper functions to return an array containing all the items in a set. That isn’t very useful on its own, so in this post I’ll show you how to generate an entire dynamic table using Excel cube functions and Lambda helper functions.

In this post I’ll be using the same source data as in my previous post: a table containing sales data with just two columns.

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Data Mesh and Ownership Strategies

James Serra aims to clear up some confusion:

I have done a ton of research lately on Data Mesh (see the excellent Building a successful Data Mesh – More than just a technology initiative for more details), and have some concerns about the paradigm shift it requires. My last blog tackled the one about Centralized vs decentralized data architecture. In this one I want to talk about centralized ownership vs decentralized ownership, along with another paradigm shift (or core principle) closely related to it, siloed data engineering teams vs cross-functional data domain teams.

First I wanted to mention there is a Data Mesh Learning slack channel that I have spent a lot of time reading and what is apparent is there is a lot of confusion on exactly what a data mesh is and how to build it. I see this as a major problem as the more difficult it is to explain a concept the more difficult it will be for companies to successfully build that concept, so the promise of a data mesh improving the failure rates for big data projects will be difficult to achieve if we can’t all agree exactly what a data mesh is. What’s more is the core principles of the data mesh sound great in theory but will have challenges in implementing them, hence my thoughts in this blog on centralized ownership vs decentralized ownership.

Read on for James’s take on the matter.

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Historical Dimensions in a Kimball-Style Model

Vince Iacoboni takes a stab at improving the Kimball model:

We owe a lot to Ralph Kimball and friends. His practical warehouse design and conformed-dimension bus architecture are the industry standard. Business users can understand and query these warehouses directly and gain valuable insights into the business. Kimball’s practical approach focuses squarely on clarity and ease of use for the business users of the warehouse. Kudos to you and yours, Mr. Kimball.

That said, can the mainstay Type 2 slowly changing dimension be improved? I here present the concept of historical dimensions as a way to solve some issues with the basic Type 2 slowly changing dimension promoted by Kimball. As we will see, clearly distinguishing between current and past dimension values pays off in clarity of design, flexibility of presentation, and ease of ETL maintenance.

As I was reading this, I was thinking “This sounds like a type 4 SCD” and Vince walks us through the differences between the two ideas. I’m not absolutely sold on the idea, but it is certainly interesting.

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Mistakes to Avoid in a BI Platform Migration

Chris Webb covers five things to consider when migrating your BI platform, using Power BI as an example:

Every report has a data source and getting source data in the right format for your BI platform is a substantial task – so much so, that you might be tempted to put Power BI on top of the data sources you have created for your previous BI platform with no changes. However different BI platforms need their data in different formats. Many BI platforms like their data munged together in one big table, sometimes even with data at different granularities in the same table. Power BI, on the other hand, likes its source data modelled as a star schema (you can find out what a star schema is and why it’s important here). If you don’t model your data as a star schema you may find that you see incorrect values in your reports, that report performance is poor, and that it’s a lot harder to write the DAX calculations that you need.

Four out of the five fit just as well with any other data platform technology.

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Clarifying Nomenclature around Azure Synapse Analytics

James Serra clears a few things up:

I see a lot of confusion among many people on what features are available today in Azure Synapse Analytics (formally called Azure SQL Data Warehouse) and what features are coming in the future. Below is a picture (click to zoom) that I describe below that hopefully clears things up:

I tend to just say “Azure Synapse Analytics SQL Pools” for the product formerly known as Azure SQL Data Warehouse and save “Azure Synapse Analytics” to include Spark + hyperscale (James’s v3).

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Visual Studio 2019 and SQL Server Extensions

Tomaz Kastrun shows how you can install support for SSIS, SSAS, and SSRS with Visual Studio 2019:

Visual Studio 2019 brings new installation of SQL Server Integration services and SQL Server Analysis Services and SQL Server Reporting Services.

There is no need to download SSDT (SQL Server Data Tools for Visual Studio) as used to do with Visual Studio 2017 or previous versions.

Installation is pretty easy once you know where to look.

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Extracting Numerical Data Points From Images

Matt Allington visualizes changes in the Gartner magic quadrant for BI tools:

Today Gartner released the 2019 magic quadrant for Business Intelligence.  As expected (by me at least), Microsoft is continuing its trail blazing and now has a clear lead over Tableau in both ability to execute and completeness of vision.  I thought it would be interesting to see a trend over time for the last 5 years, as this is the time period that I have been a professional Power BI Consultant.  I needed some way to extract the numerical data points from the images I had collected.  This article shows you how to do that.  Here is the final output – a scatter chart with a play axis in Power BI of course.

I was just commenting the other day about how somebody should do this and Matt went and did it.

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