Building OData Sources In Biml

Cathrine Wilhelmsen gives us a workaround for no native OData support in Biml:

As of July 2018, there is no built-in Biml support for OData. To work with OData in Biml, you have to create a custom source and connection manager. This requires more Biml code than built-in functions like OleDbSource and may look a little overwhelming at first. But don’t worry! You don’t have to start from scratch.

In this blog post, we will first look at the properties of the OData Connection Manager and how to script it in Biml. Then, we will do the same for the OData Source. Finally, we will tie it all together and create a complete SSIS package that you can use a starting point for your own projects.

There’s a quick and easy solution but definitely read the whole thing to catch any oddities which might arise from reverse engineering your SSIS packages.

Bug When Importing Packages In BimlExpress 2018

Kevin Feasel

2018-06-27

Biml, Bugs

Andy Leonard reports a bug as well as a temporary workaround for BimlExpress 2018:

I had no sooner published my blog post about the coolness of Biml 2018 when I encountered a bug trying to use one of the features I really like – converting SSIS packages to Biml using (FREE!) BimlExpress 2018.

My first response was, “Durnit! This worked in the test versions.” My second response was to drop a note into an issue-tracking site Varigence set up to record these kinds of things.

And then I started getting emails similar to, “Hey Andy, I get this error when I try to use the new ‘Convert SSIS Packages to Biml’ feature”…

David Stein has a workaround for us until Varigence can fix the bug.

Biml 2018 Release Day

Andy Leonard has a bunch of new presents to unwrap:

Varigence keeps giving away cool stuff! Nowhere is Varigence’s commitment to community more evident than in the feature list for BimlExpress 2018. The previous version – BimlExpress 2017 – included the Preview Pane. BimlExpress 2018 includes the ability to Convert SSIS Packages to Biml:

How cool is that? And it’s in the free (FREE!) version!

As with BimlFlex and BimlStudio, there are too many cool features to list here. Head over to the BimlExpress 2018 feature page to learn more.

Converting existing packages to Biml was a great feature that I could never afford.  It’s exceedingly nice of Scott Currie & crew to make that available in the free product.

Using Biml With Azure Data Factory v2

Kevin Feasel

2018-03-14

Biml, Cloud

Ben Weissman shows how you can use BimlStudio to build ADF v2 flows:

As you may have seen at PASS Summit 2017 or another event, with the announcement of Azure Data Factory v2 (adf), Biml will natively support adf objects.

Please note, that the native support is currently only available in BimlStudio 2018. If you’re using BimlExpress, you can still generate the JSON for your pipelines, datasets etc. using Biml but you cannot use the newly introduced tags.

The really good parts are only available in the paid product; if you do a lot of Azure Data Factory work, that might tip the scales in favor of getting BimlStudio.

Building A Biml Project: Adding Tasks

Kevin Feasel

2018-02-28

Biml

Martin Schoombee continues his series on building a Biml project by adding SSIS tasks:

The <DirectInput> tag is pretty self-explanatory and executes the stored procedure (in this case). It could also have been a SQL query.

The <Results> element contains a <Result> child element for each field returned in our query. I found this a little confusing at first, but the Name property’s value should reflect the name of the field that is returned from your query or stored proc.

The VariableName property is then used to map the returned field’s value to the relevant variable, and note that we don’t use the “User::<variable>” notation that we see elsewhere in SSIS, but we refer to the scope of the variable with the “User.” prefix. I’m guessing that the change in syntax is because of some other dependencies and/or potential clashes between the Biml compiler and SSIS itself.

This has been a good introductory-level series so far; check it out if you haven’t already.

Loading Data From Excel With Biml

Kevin Feasel

2018-02-23

Biml

Ben Weissman loads an Excel file with Biml:

Did you know, that you could call GetDatabaseSchema on Excel files? You can!

Just define an ExcelConnection first:

01_Environment.biml
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<Biml xmlns="http://schemas.varigence.com/biml.xsd">
    <Connections>
        <ExcelConnection Name="MyExcel" ConnectionString="Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;Data Source=C:\Flatfiles\XLS\MyExcel.xlsx;Extended Properties=&quot;Excel 12.0 XML;HDR=YES&quot;;" />
        <OleDbConnection Name="Target" ConnectionString="Data Source=localhost;initial catalog=MySimpleBiml_Destination;provider=SQLNCLI11;integrated security=SSPI"></OleDbConnection>
    </Connections>
    <Databases>
        <Database Name="MySimpleBiml_Destination" ConnectionName="Target"></Database>
    </Databases>
    <Schemas>
        <Schema Name="dbo" DatabaseName="MySimpleBiml_Destination"></Schema>
    </Schemas>
</Biml>

You can call GetDatabaseSchema on that connection and loop through the tables just like any regular database.

Click through to see what to do with this connection.

Annotations And ObjectTags In Biml

Kevin Feasel

2018-02-12

Biml

Cathrine Wilhelmsen explains how to use Annotations and ObjectTags to store metadata in Biml:

There are two types of annotations in the Biml language. The first type is SSIS Annotations. An SSIS annotation is a comment inside your SSIS package that is visible on the design surface. This is what most SSIS developers think of when they hear the word “annotation”.

The second type, and the type covered in this blog post, is Biml Annotations. Biml annotations are more than just comments inside a package. They can be used to store additional string metadata on any Biml object, and can also be used in auto-generated documentation.

There are four types of Biml annotations: CodeComment, Documentation, Description, and Tag. You can read more about them in the official AnnotationType documentation.

I know I’ve underused Annotations in my Biml work, so this was good to read.

DRY With Biml

Kevin Feasel

2018-01-23

Biml

Cathrine Wilhelmsen shows how to use tiered Biml files to prevent repetition:

Many Biml solutions start very simple, with just a single Biml file that generates a few SSIS packages. Most developers quickly see the need for a more complex solution for multiple sources. One way to reuse code and apply the Don’t Repeat Yourself software engineering principle in Biml is to use Tiered Biml Files.

In addition to using Tiered Biml Files, there are four other main ways you can avoid repeating your Biml code:

In this post we will look at how to use Tiered Biml Files.

Tiering is a helpful mechanism for doing work in one location and using the subsequent results of that work within your Biml solution.  Read the whole thing.

Generating Task Factory Dynamics CRM Loads With Biml

Meagan Longoria shows how to use Biml to generate SSIS packages which use the Task Factory Dynamics CRM source:

I recently worked on a project where a client wanted to use Biml to create SSIS packages to stage data from Dynamics 365 CRM. My first attempt using a script component had an error, which I think is related to a bug in the Biml engine with how it currently generates script components, so I had to find a different way to accomplish my goal. (If you have run into this issue with Biml, please comment so I know it’s not just me! I have yet to get Varigence to confirm it.) This client owned the Pragmatic Works Task Factory, so we used the Dynamics CRM source to retrieve data.

Meagan has the code as well as some important notes, so read the whole thing.

Biml Metadata, With And Without BimlStudio

Ben Weissman has a pair of posts regarding metadata models in Biml.  First up, he gives us the high-roller solution:

If you’re lucky enough to be a BimlStudio user, you have access to the Biml Metadata feature! This feature allows you to build a Metadata model that fits your exacts needs which can then be browsed and used through a Metadata Instance using a dynamic object model.

As you probably still want to maintain your metadata outside of BimlStudio, we’ve build this little piece of code. It will ready your meta-Schema from a given SQL Database and build a Biml Metadata-Model from it. In a second step, it will also import the contents of your model into an instance:

If your company doesn’t want to shell out the cash to buy a license for BimlStudio, Ben also has a version for people using the free BimlExpress tool:

So maybe you’ve noticed our blog post on deriving metadata from SQL Server into BimlStudio, but you are using BimlExpress and therefore don’t have access to the feature described in there? While it’s true, that BimlExpress doesn’t support the Metadata features of the Biml language, there are similar ways of achieving a flexible metadata model in Biml.

This post shows you, how you can build a model in SQL Server, import it to Biml including derived relationships etc. and use it in a very flexible way.

To get started, we need to set up a sample model in SQL Server first. You can either download the scripts from https://solisyon.de/files/SetupDerivedMetadata.sql or scroll to the very end of that page. Although your individual model can and will differ from this one, we suggest you follow along using our example and start tweaking it afterwards!

Once you really get how Biml converts metadata to packages, life gets so much easier.

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