SQL Server Data File Size Limit: 16 TB

Dave Mason learned the hard way that data files max out at 16 TB in SQL Server:

I could see that most of the stored proc execution calls were coming from the same server, which was a processing server running a web service. The customer decided to shut down the service and have a quick discussion with his dev team to see if there had been any recent changes deployed. We called it a night. I got a text the next morning. The server was rebooted, and performance had improved noticeably. None to my surprise, I got another call later that day: performance had deteriorated again.
I got back online and looked at all the same things I’d looked at before and still was puzzled.

I think this is a case where Swart’s Ten Percent Rule is easier to violate than most: terabyte-sized databases are fairly common these days, though most of them probably have multiple data files to help with piecemeal recovery.

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