Naming Conventions In SQL Server

Kevin Feasel

2019-01-14

Naming

Phil Factor explains naming requirements for SQL Server and gives suggestions for conventions to follow:

There are no generally accepted standards for naming SQL objects. Although ISO/IEC 11179 has been referred to as a standard for naming, it actually only sets a standard for defining naming conventions. There is a sample standard in the ‘Naming principles’ document (ISO/IEC 11179-5), but this is merely an example of how a standard should be defined. However, it is quite close to a general good-practice in programming.

When naming a table, it is a good idea to use a collective name or ‘object class term’ for the entity if one exists ( such as Employee, Cost, Tree, component, member, audience, staff or faculty) but use the singular rather than the plural form where possible. For the sake of maintenance, use a consistent naming convention that is informative but brief. It helps greatly to start with a dictionary of the correct nouns and verbs associated with the application domain and use that. If it proves inadequate, then the team can build on it. If a data model has been created as part of the design phase, this dictionary should be an end-product of this work.

As Phil notes at the end, consistency is the most important virtue here. It’s hard to work with a database where you have tables named Employees, employee_dates, and tblFiredEmployee.

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