Finding Max Concurrent Operations With T-SQL

Kevin Feasel

2019-01-04

T-SQL

I have a post up showing how to calculate the maximum number of concurrent operations using T-SQL:

You can probably see by this point how the pieces are coming together:  each time frame has a starting point and an ending point.  If there were no overlap at all, we’d see in the fourth column a number followed by a NULL, followed by a number followed by a NULL, etc.  But we clearly don’t see that:  we see work item ordinals 3 and 4 share some overlap:  item 3 started at 3:06:15 PM and ended after item 4’s start of 3:07:20 PM.  This means that those two overlapped to some extent.  Then we see two NULL values, which means they both ended before 5 began.  So far so good for our developers!

Click through for a bunch of T-SQL scripts, images, and important advice about always having interns around to take the blame.

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