What Read Committed Isolation Level Gets You

Paul Randal explains the answer, which is “not much”:

The ‘weird’ behavior is that when the “Batch 2” select completes, after having been blocked by the “Batch 1” transaction, it doesn’t return all 1,000 rows (even though “Batch 1” has completed). Furthermore, depending on when the “Batch 2” select is started, during the 10-seconds that “Batch 1” executes, “Batch 2” returns different numbers of rows. This behavior had also been reported on earlier versions of SQL Server as well. It’s easy to reproduce on SQL Server 2016/2017 and can be reproduced in all earlier versions with a single configuration change (more details in a moment).

Additionally, if the table has a clustered index created, 1,000 rows are returned every time, on all versions of SQL Server.

So why is this weird? Many people expect that all 1,000 rows will be returned every time AND that the structure of the table or the version of SQL Server should not make any difference.

Unfortunately, that assumption is not correct when using read committed.

Read Committed is a trade-off, not an ideal.

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