Kevin Feasel



Andy Levy points out that the TOP operator doesn’t always apply to each element in a UNION:

This system uses TOP every now and then trying to limit the number of records it gets back (and the developers always seem to use the arbitrary 301 – I’m guessing some degree of cargo cult programming going on). I’d prefer a well-constructed WHERE clause to limit the result set but beggars can’t be choosers when working with legacy vendor code.

What I found odd was that the Ledger1 table didn’t get a lot of traffic – with the WHEREclause in use (omitted here for brevity), you’d only get a handful of records, maybe a dozen at most.

Click through to see the rest of the problem, as well as Andy’s solution.

Related Posts


Kenneth Fisher explains a couple of database name functions in SQL Server: I’d never seen ORIGINAL_DB_NAME until recently and I thought it would be interesting to highlight it out, and in particular the difference between it and DB_NAME. I use DB_NAME and DB_ID fairly frequently in support queries (for example what database context is a query running from or what database are […]

Read More

Using STRING_AGG In SQL Server 2017

Derik Hammer talks about one of the nicer T-SQL additions in SQL Server 2017: Creating comma separated strings from a column, or delimited strings as I like to call it, is a very common problem in SQL. Beginning with SQL Server 2017 and Azure SQL Database, there is now another option to the existing set of solutions, STRING_AGG(). I […]

Read More


November 2017
« Oct Dec »