When “Invalid Column Name” Isn’t A Permissions Issue

Kenneth Fisher shares a story of hunting down the cause of an error message:

This time we had a vendor reporting the following error:

Msg 207, Level 16, State 1, Line 7
Invalid column name ‘Name’

Now the vendor was certain this was a permissions issue. It worked fine on their systems, it worked fine on some of ours. So why didn’t it always work? Well, the easy answer is permissions! Particularly since we had denied them db_owner just recently.

So why do I sound so dismissive about permissions as a possibility? I mean it COULD be permissions. It certainly is possible. But first of all, we don’t use column level permissions very often (no one uses them all that often from what I can tell) and secondly it worked on several other systems where they had exactly the same permissions as this system.

Ok, so what is the problem? You guessed it! (I really have to stop asking for guesses after I’ve put the answer in the title.)

I went out of my way not to give the answer here, so you’ll have to look at Kenneth’s title.  And then read the whole thing.

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