Converting DATETIME2 To VARBINARY

Randolph West unravels a mystery around byte lengths:

Quite a lot to take in. Let’s break this down.

DATETIME2 is a data type that was introduced in SQL Server 2008. It uses up to 8 bytes to store a date and time: 3 bytes for the date component, and up to 5 bytes for the time component.

The point here is that it uses 8 bytes in total. That’s it. No more.

Jemma noted that when converting the DATETIME2 data type to BINARY, it suddenly became longer by exactly one byte, which seems strange.

Read on for the solution.

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