The Value Of Tidyeval

Kevin Feasel

2017-08-30

R

Bruno Rodrigues explains why he likes tidyeval:

Last year, this column, let’s call it spam, had values 1 for good and 0 for bad. This year the column is called Spam and the values are 1 and 2. When I found out that this was the source of the problem, I just had to change the arguments of my functions from

generate_spam_plot(dataset = data2016, column = spam, value = 1)
generate_spam_plot(dataset = data2016, column = spam, value = 0)

to

generate_spam_plot(dataset = data2017, column = Spam, value = 1)
generate_spam_plot(dataset = data2017, column = Spam, value = 2)

without needing to change anything else. This is why I use tidyeval; without it, writing a function such as genereta_spam_plot would not be easy. It would be possible, but not easy.

Read the whole thing.

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