SSIS In Visual Studio 2017

Koen Verbeeck shows how to get SQL Server Integration Services support within Visual Studio 2017:

However, if you wanted to use Visual Studio 2017 you had to wait till today (August 23, 2017). There are several reasons why you want to use VS 2017 over VS 2015:

  • You are one of the cool kids and you use only the latest Visual Studio

  • There’s no TFS Explorer plug-in available for Visual Studio 2015. If you want to install SQL Server Data Tools only (thus without the full-blown Visual Studio), and you wanted TFS integration, you couldn’t use VS 2015. Unless you installed VS 2015 Community Edition (which has its own license issues).

  • You have a brand new laptop and you don’t want to install multiple versions of Visual Studio (the situation I’m currently in).

Read the comments for more details and clarification.

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