The Importance Of A Test Environment

Randolph West explains why it’s important to have a test environment separate from your development and production environments:

Some companies I’ve worked with have different forms of testing environments, including QA (Quality Assurance), IAT (Internal Acceptance Testing), and UAT (User Acceptance Testing). What they are called doesn’t matter, so long as they exist.

In a typical IT deployment, whether using Waterfall, Agile, or other development methodologies of the month, it pays to have a basic developmenttestproduction deployment path.

Randolph explains it in some detail but one of the big benefits for me is that you can make sure that deployment process works before deployment time.  Knowing that your checked-in scripts won’t break the deployment (because they didn’t break the CI build and release) makes the release process a lot less stressful.

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Proving ETL Correctness

Ed Elliott shares a few techniques for testing ETL processes: Reconciliation is the process of going to your source system, getting a number and validating that number on the target. This ranges from being easy to impossible, so you need to decide what to reconcile on a case by case basis. In its simplest form, […]

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Testing ETL Pipelines

Ed Elliott has started a new series on testing ETL pipelines: We test in production, this means we have monitoring and do things like have phased roll-outs using feature flags, or we roll-out to select customers first, prove it then roll it out to everyone else. Testing in production doesn’t mean hacking around getting some […]

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