R Is Bad For You?

Kevin Feasel

2017-05-18

R

Bill Vorhies lays out a controversial argument:

I have been a practicing data scientist with an emphasis on predictive modeling for about 16 years.  I know enough R to be dangerous but when I want to build a model I reach for my SAS Enterprise Miner (could just as easily be SPSS, Rapid Miner or one of the other complete platforms).

The key issue is that I can clean, prep, transform, engineer features, select features, and run 10 or more model types simultaneously in less than 60 minutes (sometimes a lot less) and get back a nice display of the most accurate and robust model along with exportable code in my selection of languages.

The reason I can do that is because these advanced platforms now all have drag-and-drop visual workspaces into which I deploy and rapidly adjust each major element of the modeling process without ever touching a line of code.

I have almost exactly the opposite thought on the matter:  that drag-and-drop development is intolerably slow; I can drag and drop and connect and click and click and click for a while, or I can write a few lines of code.  Nevertheless, I think Bill’s post is well worth reading.

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