SQL Server Updates For MacOS

Kevin Feasel

2017-05-17

Tools

Meet Bhagdev has a couple MacOS-related announcements for SQL Server.  First, the SQL Server team has released command line tools:

We are delighted to share the production-ready release of the SQL Server Command Line Tools (sqlcmd and bcp) on macOS El Capitan and Sierra.

The sqlcmd utility is a command-line tool that lets you submit T-SQL statements or batches to local and remote instances of SQL Server. The utility is extremely useful for repetitive database tasks such as batch processing or unit testing.

The bulk copy program utility (bcp) bulk copies data between an instance of Microsoft SQL Server and a data file in a user-specified format. The bcp utility can be used to import large numbers of new rows into SQL Server tables or to export data out of tables into data files.

Second, there’s a new ODBC driver available:

  • Azure AD support – You can now use Azure AD authentication (username/password) to centrally manage identities of database users and as an alternative to SQL Server authentication.

  • Always Encrypted support – You can now use Always Encrypted. Always Encrypted lets you transparently encrypt the data in the application, so that SQL Server will only handle the encrypted data and not plaintext values. Even if the SQL instance or the host machine is compromised, an attacker gets ciphertext of the sensitive data.

  • Table Valued Parameters (TVP) support – TVP support allows a client application to send parameterized data to the server more efficiently by sending multiple rows to the server with a single call. You can use the ODBC Driver 13.1 to encapsulate rows of data in a client application and send the data to the server in a single parameterized command.

Multi-platform is the catchword of the day.  If you’re a MacOS user, this might be a portent of things to come.

Related Posts

Database Health Monitor Update

Kevin Feasel

2019-08-16

Tools

Steve Stedman has an update to the Database Health Monitor: Today I released the August 2019 release of Database Health Monitor. This is version 2.9. My favorite new report is the Blocking By Hour of Day report which uses the existing data that is collected by the historic monitoring feature. Click through for the change list.

Read More

Management Studio’s Staying Power

Kendra Little explains why SQL Server Management Studio isn’t going away anytime soon: After all, SSMS is no longer the cool new kid on the block: Microsoft has shown consistent effort to develop their new tool, Azure Data Studio (the artist formerly known as SQL Operations Studio), since November 2017. Azure Data Studio is built on the […]

Read More

Categories