EF Core Merge Statements

Richie Rump looks at SQL that Entity Framework Core generates when inserting a batch of records:

If you’re an experienced SQL tuner, you’ll notice some issues with this statement. First off the query has not one but two table variables. It’s generally better to use temp tables because table variables don’t have good statistics by default. Secondly, the statement uses a MERGE statement. The MERGE statement has had more than it’s fair share of issues. See Aaron’s Bertrand’s post “Use Caution with SQL Server’s MERGE Statement” for more details on those issues.

But that got me wondering, why would the EF team use SQL features that perform so poorly? So I decided to take a closer look at the SQL statement. Just so you know the code that was used to generate the SQL saves three entities (Katana, Kama, and Tessen) to the database in batch. (Julie used a Samurai theme so I just continued with it.)

Yeah…I’m not liking the MERGE statement very much here.

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