SQL Agent’s 5 Second Rule

Ewald Cress uncovers a change in the way the SQL Agent scheduler works in SQL Server 2016 compared to prior versions:

Upon completion of a job, the next run time is calculated based on the last scheduled time plus the schedule interval. However, allowance is made for the edge cases where the completed invocation overruns into the next start time. In such a situation, there isn’t a “catch-up” run; instead, the schedule is advanced iteratively until it reaches a future point in time.

However, 2016 introduces a new twist. When applying the “is the proposed next schedule time after Now()?” check, it adds five seconds to Now(). In other words, the question becomes “Is the proposed next schedule time more than five seconds in the future?”

Ewald jumps into the debugger to understand this better, so click through for that.

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