Logistic Regression With R

Raghavan Madabusi runs through a sample logistic regression:

Input Variables: These variables are called as predictors or independent variables.

  • Customer Demographics (Gender and Senior citizenship)
  • Billing Information (Monthly and Annual charges, Payment method)
  • Product Services (Multiple line, Online security, Streaming TV, Streaming Movies, and so on)
  • Customer relationship variables (Tenure and Contract period)

Output Variables: These variables are called as response or dependent variables. Since the output variable (Churn value) takes the binary form as “0” or “1”, it will be categorized under classification problem in the supervised machine learning.

One of the interesting things in this post was the use of missmap, which is part of Amelia.

Related Posts

Combining Plots In R With cowplot

Abdul Majed Raja shows how to use the cowplot library in R to merge together independent plots into a single image: The way it works in cowplot is that, we have assign our individual ggplot-plots as an R object (which is by default of type ggplot). These objects are finally used by cowplot to produce […]

Read More

Classifying Texts With Naive Bayes

I continue my series on Naive Bayes with another hand-calculation post: Step two is, on the surface, pretty tough: how do we figure out if a set of words is a business phrase or a baseball phrase? We could try to think up a set of features. For example, how long is the phrase? How many unique […]

Read More

Categories

April 2017
MTWTFSS
« Mar May »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930