Logistic Regression With R

Raghavan Madabusi runs through a sample logistic regression:

Input Variables: These variables are called as predictors or independent variables.

  • Customer Demographics (Gender and Senior citizenship)
  • Billing Information (Monthly and Annual charges, Payment method)
  • Product Services (Multiple line, Online security, Streaming TV, Streaming Movies, and so on)
  • Customer relationship variables (Tenure and Contract period)

Output Variables: These variables are called as response or dependent variables. Since the output variable (Churn value) takes the binary form as “0” or “1”, it will be categorized under classification problem in the supervised machine learning.

One of the interesting things in this post was the use of missmap, which is part of Amelia.

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