Benchmarking

Lukas Eder notes that the best way to compare performance is to…compare performance:

To bust a myth, if you have good reasons to think that a differently written, but semantically equivalent query might be faster (on your database), you should measure. Don’t even trust any execution plan, because ultimately, what really counts is the wall clock time in your production system.

If you can measure your queries in production, that’s perfect. But often, you cannot – but you don’t always have to. One way to compare two queries with each other is to benchmark them by executing each query hundreds or even thousands of times in a row.

Lukas goes on to compare a left join to a correlated subquery in three separate database products and the results are very interesting although absolutely not comparable across products because the DeWitt Clause is still a thing.  Great read.

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