JSON Dates In SQL Server

Bert Wagner explains how to handle JSON datetime strings in SQL Server:

In SQL Server, datetime2’s format is defined as follows:

YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss[.fractional seconds]

JSON date time strings are defined like:

YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.sssZ

Honestly, they look pretty similar. However, there are few key differences:

  • JSON separates the date and time portion of the string with the letter T

  • The Z is optional and indicates that the datetime is in UTC (if the Z is left off, JavaScript defaults to UTC). You can also specify a different timezone by replacing the Z with a + or  along with HH:mm (ie. -05:00 for Eastern Standard Time)

  • The precision of SQL’s datetime2 goes out to 7 decimal places, in JSON and JavaScript it only goes out to 3 places, so truncation may occur.

Read on for a few scripts handling datetime conversions between these types.

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