Writing A Better Abstract

Kevin Feasel



Adnan Fiaz reviews conference abstracts for patterns:

Certainly an interesting graph! It may have been better to show the proportions instead of counts as the number of abstracts in each category are not equal. Nevertheless, the conclusion remains the same. The words “r” and “data” are clearly the most common. However, what is more interesting is that abstracts in the “yes” category use certain words significantly more often than abstracts in the “no” category and vice versa (more often because a missing bar doesn’t necessarily mean a zero observation). For example, the words “science”, “production” and “performance” occur more often in the “yes” category. Vice versa, the words “tools”, “product”, “package” and “company(ies)” occur more often in the “no” category. Also, the word “application” occurs in its singular form in the “no” category and in its plural form in the “yes” category. Certainly, at EARL we like our applications to be plural, it is in the name after all.

Granted, this is only abstracts for one conference, but it’s an interesting idea.

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