Don’t Hard-Code Values

Kevin Feasel

2017-03-27

T-SQL

Jana Sattainathan argues against hard-coding values in queries:

I have heard arguments for doing this type source code

  • This is a one-time thing. We do not have the need to do it anywhere else

  • We are on a deadline

  • We do not have the ability to test if this was not done this way

  • My program is going away in a week

  • We do not have the time to correct this

  • I am just following the existing pattern

  • Unofficially (not) said – “This is my job security”

I’m with Jana in principle, but there are performance costs at the margin, making this less of a hard-and-fast rule than I’d like.

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