Traipsing Through commondelete

Ewald Cress focuses on a function named commondelete to explain reference counting and an elegant use for vftables:

Notionally we can imagine a global portfolio of active memory allocations, each chunk uniquely identified by its starting address. When we want memory, we ask the global memory manager to lend us some from the unused pool, and when we’re done with it, we hand it back to that memory manager, who carefully locks its internal structures during such operations, because we should only access mutable global state in a single-threaded manner, and…. Oops. No, no, double no. That is not how SQL Server does things, right?

Okay, we know that there are actually a variety of memory allocators out there. If nothing else, this avoid the single bottleneck problem. But now the question becomes one of knowing which allocator to return a chunk of memory to after we’re done with it.

As usual, this is a deep and interesting blog post from Ewald.

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