Control Flow Package Parts

Todd McDermid explains a feature new to Integration Services 2016:

The basic idea behind package parts makes complete sense to a coder – they’re macros.  You take code you’ve used in several places, put it in a separate file that you then include and “expand” in multiple other files.
If you have multiple packages with parts of the Control Flow that are identical – setting up a database in a certain way, sending emails, calling a set of stored procedures, … – then Control Flow Package Parts can help.
The assistance isn’t just limited to the initial coding, either.  Yes – creating a new package with the “duplicate” code is much easier.  But the real gain of Control Flow Package Parts is when your “standard” code needs changes.  Instead of having to edit multiple packages to address the modifications – you only have to alter the package part.  Deploying the project(s) that depend on this part automatically incorporates those improvements.

I’d be a lot more interested in this if Biml weren’t already a better option.  Read on for Todd’s rundown.

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