Format Your Code

Kevin Feasel



Grant Fritchey looks at some poorly-formatted code:

You are going to cause all sorts of problems if you write code like this. First off, if you really do have these three queries within the same stored procedure, how hard will it be to confuse which is table ‘a’ in each of the queries when you go back to edit them? Pretty easy.

It gets worse though. I know that none of us will ever write a query that exceeds 26 tables in a JOIN… well, except that one time… and that other time. In fact, it happens. Oh, it’s not always a good thing, but it’s a thing. How do we respond to that? I’ve seen this:

Some of this stuff is egregious.  Some of it is debatable.  But either way, well-formatted code helps prevent bugs and aid understanding of queries.

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