Ordering In Views

Kevin Feasel

2016-09-20

T-SQL

Kenneth Fisher explains why you shouldn’t order in views:

For many years it’s been a best practice to never put an ORDER BY in a view. The idea is that a view shouldn’t have an inherent order. Just like any other query. If you want the data from a view ordered then you query the view with an ORDER BY clause. In fact if you put an ORDER BY in a view you’ll get an error:

Msg 1033, Level 15, State 1, Procedure MyView, Line 4 [Batch Start Line 2]
The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP, OFFSET or FOR XML is also specified.

I knew about the TOP 100 PERCENT bit, but had no idea that order was outright ignored.  Read the comments for additional information.

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