Ordering In Views

Kevin Feasel



Kenneth Fisher explains why you shouldn’t order in views:

For many years it’s been a best practice to never put an ORDER BY in a view. The idea is that a view shouldn’t have an inherent order. Just like any other query. If you want the data from a view ordered then you query the view with an ORDER BY clause. In fact if you put an ORDER BY in a view you’ll get an error:

Msg 1033, Level 15, State 1, Procedure MyView, Line 4 [Batch Start Line 2]
The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP, OFFSET or FOR XML is also specified.

I knew about the TOP 100 PERCENT bit, but had no idea that order was outright ignored.  Read the comments for additional information.

Related Posts


Kenneth Fisher explains a couple of database name functions in SQL Server: I’d never seen ORIGINAL_DB_NAME until recently and I thought it would be interesting to highlight it out, and in particular the difference between it and DB_NAME. I use DB_NAME and DB_ID fairly frequently in support queries (for example what database context is a query running from or what database are […]

Read More

Using STRING_AGG In SQL Server 2017

Derik Hammer talks about one of the nicer T-SQL additions in SQL Server 2017: Creating comma separated strings from a column, or delimited strings as I like to call it, is a very common problem in SQL. Beginning with SQL Server 2017 and Azure SQL Database, there is now another option to the existing set of solutions, STRING_AGG(). I […]

Read More


September 2016
« Aug Oct »