Auditing Dropped Databases

Jason Brimhall shows how to figure out who dropped that database:

What do you do when you run into that missing database situation and the inevitable denial that will ensue?  This is when an audit can save the day.  Through an audit, you can discover who dropped the database and when it happened.  Then you have hard data to take back to the team to again ask what happened.  Taking the info from a previous article of mine, we can alter the script I published there and re-use it for our needs here.

This is available in the default trace or, as Jason points out, you can create an Extended Event (which data can live much longer than that in the default trace).

Related Posts

Orphaned Users in SQL Server

Dave Bland walks us through one way to fix an orphaned user: In my many years of working as a DBA, I have encountered many disabled logins.  However, I have never really encountered what looks to be a disabled database user account.  I didn’t even think it was possible to disable a user account in […]

Read More

Defining Downtime Down

Andy Mallon takes us through the notion of downtime: There’s a lot of discussion about preventing downtime. As a DBA and IT professional, it’s my sworn duty to prevent downtime. I usually describe my job as DBA something along the lines of, “to make sure data is always available to the people and applications that […]

Read More

Categories

September 2016
MTWTFSS
« Aug Oct »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930