Multi-Column, Auto-Created Statistics

Shaun J. Stuart looks into a scenario in which it appears that multi-column, auto-created statistics were generated:

Wow.. That sure looks like three auto-created, multi-column statistics! We have three stats: stats_ids 3, 4, and 5. The sys.stats_column table contains one row for each column that is in a statistic, so multiple rows for a single statistic (i.e., a single stats_id value), indicate multiple columns in that stat. Indeed, the column_id values indicate the table columns contained the stat. So stats_id 3 contains columns VersionMajor and ApplicationID (column_ids 3 and 1), stats_id 4 contains columns VersionMinor and ApplicationID (column_ids 4 and 1), and stats_id 5 contains columns VersionRevision and ApplicationID (column_ids 5 and 1). And, clearly, the auto_created flag is true, so these three stats were auto-created. What’s going on?

Read on for the answer.

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