Startup Stored Procedures

Kenneth Fisher describes startup stored procedures:

sp_procoption is a system stored procedure that lets us change the options on a stored procedure and in this case set it to run on startup. Note: The account that is running SQL Server needs to have permissions to start the Agent service. (Or do whatever your startup stored procedure does.) You can have as many stored procedures running on startup as you want but remember the more you have the longer it’s going to take for your instance to start.

There are a few uses cases in which startup stored procedures can be useful, but my reservation about them is similar to my reservation about triggers:  it’s not apparent to people that a startup stored procedure is in place, so if there is a problem with it, troubleshooting might be harder than normal without good documentation.

Related Posts

Understanding Recovery Intervals

Paul Randal explains what the recovery interval option on SQL Server really means: One of the concepts I find people misunderstand frequently is the recovery interval, either for the server as a whole or the per-database setting that was introduced in SQL Server 2012 for indirect checkpoints. There are two misconceptions here: The recovery interval equals […]

Read More

Remote DAC And Vulnerability Assessments

Max Vernon points out a SQL Server Management Studio Vulnerability Assessment check which seems somewhat incomplete: Certainly, you’d want to ensure the port for the DAC is not available to the Internet, but hopefully if you’re reading this blog you already know how silly it would be to open SQL Server to the Internet. Assuming […]

Read More


February 2016
« Jan Mar »