How Do Natively Compiled UDFs Perform?

Gail Shaw investigates natively compiled user-defined functions in SQL Server 2016:

When I saw that, the first question that came to mind is whether natively compiling a scalar function reduces the overhead when calling that function within another query. I’m not talking about data-accessing scalar UDFs, since natively compiled functions can only access in-memory tables, but functions that do simple manipulation of the parameters passed in. String formatting, for example, or date manipulation.

While not as harmful as data-accessing scalar UDFs, there’s still overhead as these are not inline functions, they’re called for each row in the resultset (as a look at the Stored Procedure Completed XE event would show), and the call to the function takes time. Admittedly not a lot of time, but when it’s on each row of a large resultset the total can be noticeable.

Read the whole thing and check out Gail’s method and conclusions.

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