R Plots In Power BI

Leila Etaati has a three-part series on displaying R visuals in Power BI.  Part 1 shows how to create a scatter plot:

so in the above picture we can see that we have 3 different fields that has been shown in the chart :highway and city speed in y and x axis. while the car’s cylinder varibale has been shown as different cycle size. However may be you need a bigger cycle to differentiate cylinder with 8 to 4 so we able to do that with add another layer by adding a function name

Part 2 shows how to use facet_grid to show multiple plots in one visual:

now I want to add other layer to this chart. by adding year and car drive option to the chart. To do that first choose year and drv  from data field in power BI. As I have mentioned before, now the dataset variable will  hold data about speed in city, speed in highway, number of cylinder, years of cars and type of drive.

I am going to use another function in the ggplot packages name “facet_grid” that helps me to show the different facet in my scatter chart. in this function, year and drv (driver) will be shown against each other.

Part 3 shows how to place charts on a map in R:

Now I have to merg the data to get the location information from “sPDF” into “ddf”. To do that I am going to use” merge” function. As you can see in below code, first argument is our first dataset “ddf” and the second one is the data on Lat and Lon of location (sPDF). the third and forth columns show the main variables for joining these two dataset as “ddf” (x) is “country” and in the second one “sPDF”  is “Admin”. the result will be stored in “df” dataset

Aside from my strong dislike of bar/pie charts on maps, this is good to know, particularly if there is not a built-in or customer Power BI visual to replicate something you can do in R.

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