Optimizing Clustered Columnstore Inserts

Sunil Agarwal talks about clustered columnstore index logging:

There you have it; our recommendation is to choose a batchsize of > 102400 to get benefits of minimal logging with clustered columnstore index. In the next blog, I will discuss parallel bulk import and locking optimizations.

My experience is that you really want to insert in large batches.

Power BI Matrices

Meagan Longoria wants to stack groups of measures in Power BI:

To my surprise, Power BI only lets you put multiple values on columns in a matrix. You can’t stack metrics vertically. Note: this is true as of 8 Jan 2016 but may change in the future. If you agree that this should be a feature in Power BI, please make your voice heard and vote for this idea on the Power BI forum and encourage others to vote for it as well.

The answer is a little complex.  Considering how frequently Power BI gets updated, hopefully they’ll make this a bit easier in the near future.

Compess An Entire Database

Shaun J. Stuart has a script which compresses all (compression-worthy) objects in a database:

Reader Dick H. posted a comment on my last version of this script stating that he got an error when this was run against tables containing sparse columns. Data compression does not support tables with sparse columns, so they should be excluded from this process. I’ve modified this script to correct this. I don’t have any tables with sparse columns in my environment, so thanks to Dick for pointing this out!

For instructions on using this script, look here.

This is a very useful script to have in your back pocket.

Row-Level Security

Manoj Pandey investigates row-level security:

Here in this post I will talk about the new Block Predicate option available in the CTP 3.0 release. With this option we can restrict write access for specific users.

Block Predicates block all write operations like:

– AFTER INSERT and AFTER UPDATE

– BEFORE UPDATE

– and BEFORE DELETE

I want this to perform well in a busy production environment.  I really, really do.

SQL Server Wants Your RAM

Andy Galbraith explains that SQL Server loves RAM:

A frequent complaint we receive comes from a client that has an in-house sysadmin monitoring tool like Microsoft SCOM/SCCM.  They turn the tool on and it startsred-alerting because the Windows server hosting SQL Server is at 90%+ used RAM.  The sysadmin (or local DBA) logs on to the server and finds that there is 5GB free (~4%), and the sqlservr.exe process is using 120GB of the 128GB on the server!

In my experience, VMware administrators tend to be most hung up about this concept.

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