Source Control In SQL Operations Studio

Drew Furgiuele reminds me why I prefer Mercurial over Git:

Of course, this just scratches the surface of using source control and Git. Now that you have a working example, I encourage you to read more especially about branching and merging, and your inevitable merge conflicts. I think branching is incredibly important if you like to tweak your scripts because it gives you a separate copy of your code to work on and test, and when you’re satisfied you merge your changes back to your master branch (or trunk).

Once you get the basics down, it’s really easy to start contributing other projects too! You could fork a project, work on it, and then submit a pull request to the owners to add features. Or, maybe someone will find code you made available and do the same. It’s amazing. Or a very minimum, this will get you up to speed on how you can introduce an SCM practice for SQL-related scripts at your workplace, if you don’t have one, or how you can start using it if you do (and don’t already).

Click through to see how Drew integrates Git with SQL Operations Studio.  Spoilers:  it’s pretty easy, given the relationship between SqlOps and Visual Studio Code.

Customizing SQL Operations Studio

Samir Behara looks at a few ways to customize SQL Operations Studio:

The Dark Theme has been one of the top requests from the developer community for SSMS for a long period now, and all the out of the box dark themes in SQL Operations Studio comes with a sigh of relief. I have liked playing around with this tool so far and am currently exploring the customization options.

Read on to see how to switch over to a dark theme, or even how to create your own theme.

Importing SSMS Registered Servers Into SQL Operations Studio

Drew Furgiuele has a hankering for SQL Operations Studio and wants to invite a few servers to the party:

One barrier to entry is that the initial setup can be a little daunting, especially if you use a local connection groups or central management servers to keep track of registered connections in SQL Server Management Studio. You’d be in for a lot of manual clicking and typing of connections if you have a lot of saved connections. But there’s a better way: you can import all that saved information right into SQL Operations Studio, and it’s pretty painless, too. Buckle up, because this involves a little knowledge of how settings are saved in Operations Studio, and how we can quickly get saved connection information out of SSMS and into your new application. Spoiler alert, we’re going to use PowerShell.

I’d love to see CMS support in SQL Operations Studio.  In the meantime, this is a more or less reasonable alternative, depending upon how many servers you have and how frequently they change.

More On Microsoft SQL Operations Studio

Dan Guzman shares some thoughts on Microsoft SQL Operations Studio:

Microsoft made the new cross-platform SQL Operations Studio (SOS) tool available on Github this week as a free open-source project. This SOS preview allows one to develop and manage SQL Server and Azure SQL Database from Windows, Linux, and macOS. The current preview can be downloaded from the SOS portal page, which also contains links to impressive quick start guides, how-to, and tutorials. I encourage you to try out the preview and improve it by reporting issues and offering suggestions.

If you are a developer, consider contributing to this project on Github. SOS is built on the Electron framework, which leverages JavaScript, HTML, and Node.js technologies to build rich cross-platform desktop applications. This is the same stack that the popular VS Code IDE employs so it’s not surprising SOS has a similar look and feel.

Click through for Dan’s thoughts and also a link to try it yourself.

Custom SQL Operations Studio Dashboard Widgets

Drew Furgiuele shows how easy it is to create a dashboard widget in SQL Operations Studio:

Before we go on, now’s your chance to name your widget. In my code above, I highlighted some of the changes I made. Also notice that this widget has a path to the query file we created; if this file doesn’t exist (or you can’t read from the path it exists on), it’ll stop working. Just a heads-up.

I named it something meaningful (but hey, do you), and I changed the vertical and horizontal size of the widget to be a little easier to read. Once you’re done, it’s time to add your widget to the dashboard.

I think people are going to like this product once it matures a bit.  This kind of flexibility without having to drop into .NET is great for DBAs for whom C# is a little intimidating.

Go Download SQL Operations Studio

The SQL Server Team has announced SQL Operations Studio:

We are excited to announce that SQL Operations Studio is now available in preview. SQL Operations Studio is a free, light-weight tool for modern database development and operations for SQL Server on Windows, Linux and Docker, Azure SQL Database and Azure SQL Data Warehouse on Windows, Mac or Linux machines.

Download SQL Operations Studio to get started.

It’s not SSMS, but it is cross-platform.  And I think that over time, it will end up being better than SSMS.

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