Upgrading SQL On Linux

Steve Jones has a post on upgrading SQL Server on Linux:

I’m cutting off part of the path, since I think it’s probably NDA. No worries, apparently the old location for me hasn’t been updated with new packages, which makes sense.

I decided to check the MS docs and see how a new user would get SSoL running? At the new docs.microsoft site, I found the Install SQL Server on Ubuntu doc.

Following the instructions, I updated the GPG keys and registered the repository with curl:

curl https://packages.microsoft.com/keys/microsoft.asc | sudo apt-key add -
curl https://packages.microsoft.com/config/ubuntu/16.04/mssql-server.list | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mssql-server.list

My expectation is that upgrading SQL Server on Linux is going to be a lot less painful than upgrading on Windows.

Samba On Linux Mint

Mark Broadbent shows how to set up SMB shares in Linux:

This quick guide is specifically targetted to the Linux Mint distribution (although will be applicable to many others) and only describes how to share your Linux filesystem folders and does not go into any detail regarding the advanced Samba functionality.

Even though Linux Mint attempts to make folder sharing more user-friendly, I have never had any success using the GUI based procedure, and have even struggled with the following method described in this article. Furthermore, I prefer to understand what is being configured behind the scenes, so I shall keep to the point and keep it simple.

Very useful post, given the cross-platform move Microsoft is making.

Community Localization For Crossplatform Tools

Mona Nasr and Andy Gonzalez are looking for tool translation support:

Community has completed the translations for VScode SQL Server extension for six languages: Brazilian, French, Japanese, Italian, Russian, and Spanish.

We still need help with other languages. If you know anyone with language expertise, refer them to the Team Page.

Your contributions are valuable and will help us improve the product in your languages. We hope to continue working with the community in future projects.

Hit up the Team Page link to learn more about how to contribute.

Be Wary Of Case Sensitivity

Slava Murygin points out that for SQL Server on Linux, case sensitivity matters a lot:

So, in that manner, SQL Server files will be located in “c:\var\opt\mssql\” directory!
Isn’t it simple?!!!
There will be no effort at all to refurbish old SQL SQL Server code for new Linux platforms!

Here I’ll give you an example of Database creation using different addressing methods:
1. I use Windows notation for data file and Linux notation for log file.
2. Because Linux systems are case sensitive it is very important to know it when you work with Linux. However, Microsoft allows you to be reluctant. You can use upper or lower case in the order you want.

Click through for an example.

Changing SQL On Linux Port

Kevin Feasel

2017-03-29

Linux

Slava Murygin shows how to change the port on which a SQL on Linux instance listens, but notes that it introduces an issue:

All these problems are expected. Prior experience shows that changing SQL Server port makes reading Error Log file impossible.

Besides of inability to read error log all other functions work fine.

I’m thinking this bug will get fixed pretty soon.  Read the whole thing.

Testing SQL Server On Linux Backups

Rob Sewell confirms that Test-DbaLastBackup in the dbatools kit works for Linux:

I have written about Test-DbaLastBackup in posts here, here and here. They have been Windows only posts.

With SQL Server vNext CTP 1.4 now available and providing SQL Agent capability on Linux, I wrote here about using Ola Hallengrens scripts on Linux SQL Servers so can Test-DbaLastBackup work with Linux?

It’s a short post but good to know.

Connecting To Linux SQL Agent Using Powershell

Slava Murygin shows how to connect to a SQL Agent running on Linux using the SqlServer Powershell module:

From this point we will work directly with SQL Server.
In order to establish connection you have to run following script.
The most important are 2nd and third lines:
– In second line you have to provide your SQL Server Instance address, by replacing “<your_server_instance>” by something like “192.168.58.11” or “192.168.58.11\MSSQLSERVER,1433”
– When second line runs it will ask you for SQL Server credentials !!! So, you have to enter SQL user name and it’s password.

Slava does note some limitations at present, but a lot of the functionality seems to be there.

SQL On Linux Backups

Rob Sewell shows how to use Ola Hallengren’s solution to back up SQL Server databases on Linux using the SQL Agent:

Now the jobs are not going to run as they are as they have CmdExec steps and this is not supported in SQL on Linux so we have to make some changes to the steps. As I blogged previously, this is really easy using PowerShell

First we need to grab the jobs into a variable. We will use Get-SQLAgentJobHistory from the sqlserver module which you need to download SSMS 2016 or later to get. You can get it from https://sqlps.io/dl As we are targeting a Linux SQL Server we will use SQL authentication which we will provide via Get-Credential and then take a look at the jobs

It’s not “point, click, done,” but Rob shows you certainly can do it.

Powershell In Bash: Cursor Issues Fixed

Max Trinidad points out that the latest alpha for Powershell in Bash has fixed an annoying display issue:

Finally, the fix we all been waiting for has arrived with the newest release of PowerShell version v6.0.0-alpha.17. Now, when you installed the Ubuntu 16.04.1 version of PowerShell 6 in Bash on Windows 10, it works this time.

Thanks God! No more crazy cursor screen issues going on when you type commands and/or display results.

Max also shows how to install the latest version of Powershell in Bash on Ubuntu in Windows 10.

Instance Configuration With dbatools

Rob Sewell has an interesting post on cross-platform configuration using dbatools in Powershell:

This weekend I set up some SQL vNext virtual machines, two on Windows and one on Linux so that I could test some scenarios and build an availability group.

IMPORTANT NOTE :- The names of dbatools commands with a Sql prefix WILL CHANGE in a later release of dbatools. dbatools will use Dba throughout in the future as the sqlserver PowerShell module uses the Sql prefix

I used PowerShell version 5.1.14393.693 and SQL Server vNext CTP 1.3 running on Windows Server 2016 and Ubuntu 16.04 in this blog post

There’s some fancy footwork in this post; if you’re looking for ways to compare instance configurations (specifically, sp_configure settings), check it out.

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