Fixing Power Settings With T-SQL

Randolph West shows how to use T-SQL and xp_cmdshell to switch a server’s power settings from Balanced to High Performance:

Windows has the same setting. It’s in the Power Options under Control Panel, and for all servers, no matter what, it should be set to High Performance.

Here’s a free T-SQL script I wrote that will check for you what the power settings are. We don’t always have desktop access to a server when we are checking diagnostics, but it’s good to know if performance problems can be addressed by a really simple fix that doesn’t require the vehicle to be at rest.

(The script also respects your settings, so if you had xp_cmdshell disabled, it’ll turn it off again when it’s done.)

Click through for the script.

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