T-SQL Tuesday Roundup

Robert Davis hosted T-SQL Tuesday, and he has a nice roundup of posts:

Thanks to everybody that participated in this month’s T-SQL Tuesday. A big thanks to everyone who wrote a participating blog post, and a really huge thanks to everyone who read the posts shared by this month’s participants. If you follow one of the links on this round-up page, I will kindly ask that you leave a comment on a blog post that you read if it teaches you something, gives you a new perspective, or makes you think. A blog post is just a bunch of words until somebody reads it, and blog writers love it when they hear that their post resonated with someone on some level.

Thanks to Robert for hosting T-SQL Tuesday #74.

Trust Relationship Failed

Chrissy LeMaire ran into a trust issue one one node of a cluster:

You know what’s scary as hell? When one node of an important cluster loses its trust relationship with the domain and you see the error “the trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed”. That happened to me late last year with one of my SQL Server 2008 R2 nodes. The scary part was that I just didn’t know what to expect. The fix could be simple, or it could require a node rebuild.

Trust no one.

Don’t Trust Task Manager

Gail Shaw warns against using Task Manager to figure out how much memory SQL Server is using:

Err, what? SQL Server’s not even using 100MB? I’ve just read 30GB of data and SQL Server’s not even using 1% of it’s allowed memory!!!

Or is it?

Spoilers:  it is.  Read the whole thing.

Setting Up A Scrub Server

Tom Norman talks about setting up a data scrubbing server:

With that said, when I setup a Scrub server, it is in a very secure area where the data access is very, very limited. For example, in my current company, the server is in a separate domain from Production and QA/Dev. Only DBAs are allowed to access this server. If you have multiple DBAs at your location, you may want to even limit which DBAs have access to this server. Our goal is to automate the entire scrubbing process so no one has to access the data including copying backup files from Production and to a shared scrub location for QA/Dev to retrieve.

Scrub servers are a way of stripping personally identifiable or sensitive information from production data so developers can safely use the data in lower, less secure environments.

Power BI Gateways

Ginger Grant talks about Personal and Enterprise Power BI Gateways:

The Personal Gateway takes the data and imports it into Power BI. If you want to extract data from a variety of different places such as an Oracle Database, and Excel Spreadsheets, the Personal Gateway will support this, and the Enterprise Gateway won’t.   Remember the Enterprise Gateway only connects to three different data sources, and Excel and Oracle are not on that list. If you want to manage connection and refresh of the data as the administrator or provide access to the data to everyone who needs it, use the Personal Gateway.

It sounds like these are currently different enough that “both” might be the correct option within an organization, at least until Enterprise Gateway adds the missing features.

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